Love in Action Heals Us and the World
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“The thread that runs through Twentyone Olive Trees is her eternal love for her son. As a grief counselor to parents who lose babies, I have witnessed countless times how the pain of the loss continues to transform over time and how much solace parents find when they eventually create an “intuitive bridge” between themselves and their child, as the author did. The poignant poems beautifully express the varied experiences of bereaved parents, and the beautifully illustrated fables will teach children and adults alike important lessons in coping with grief and moving toward hope, acceptance and growth. The author’s wish to “lift up as many people as possible” will most certainly be realized as they use their own inner wisdom and imagination to connect with their child after death.”

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